Maurice Evans

Shakespearean Actor pre WW2 and Hollywood Actor thereafter
He first appeared on the stage in 1926 and joined the Old Vic Company in 1934, playing Hamlet, Richard II and Iago

 

Maurice Evans

Maurice Evans

maurice evans - planet of the apes

Maurice Evans – Planet of the Apes

Maurice Herbert Evans (3 June 1901– 12 March 1989) was an English star kept in mind for his analyses of Shakespearean characters. In regards to his screen roles, he is probably best called Dr. Zaius in Planet of the Apes and as Samantha Stephens’ daddy Maurice in Bewitched.

Evans was born at 28 Icen Way (where there is now a memorial plaque, unveiled in 2013 by his great-great niece) in Dorchester, Dorset, England, to Laura (Turner) and Alfred Herbert Evans, a dispensing chemist and keen amateur star who made adaptations of novels by Thomas Hardy for the regional amateur company. Young Maurice made his first phase look as a small kid in “Far From The Madding Crowd”.

In 1927, he was one of a group of out-of-work actors consisting of Laurence Olivier, opted to perform in a “tryout” of R. C. Sherriff’s “Journey’s End” directed by James Whale at the Apollo Theatre in London, and later on in 1929 at the Savoy Theatre which had actually been rented by the Chicago theatre manager Maurice Browne. It was a big success, running for two years and making Maurice’s name. He played the young officer Raleigh, who dies at the end of the play. In 1934, he went to the Old Vic Theatre where his analysis of Shakespeare’s “Richard II” was extremely praised. It was as a result of this that he was invited to join Katharine Cornell in the USA. His first appearance on Broadway was in Romeo and Juliet opposite Katharine Cornell in 1936, however he made his most significant effect in Shakespeare’s Richard II, a manufacturing whose unforeseen success was the surprise of the 1937, theatre season and permitted Evans to play Hamlet (1938) (the first time that the play was performed uncut on the New York stage), Falstaff in Henry IV, Part 1 (1939), Macbeth (1941) and Malvolio in Twelfth Night (1942) opposite the Viola of Helen Hayes, all under the direction of Margaret Webster. He also starred opposite Cornell in the 1935 production of George Bernard Shaw’s St. Joan.

Evans appeared in more American tv productions of Shakespeare than other star. Beginning in 1953, for the famous tv anthology, Hallmark Hall of Fame, he starred in the first feature-length (i.e., longer than an hour) dramatisations of the plays to ever exist on American television. They were:

Hamlet
Macbeth (twice – both times appearing with Judith Anderson who won an Emmy for both of her tv efficiencies as Lady Macbeth,. [2] Evans won an Emmy Award for the latter, 1960 manufacturing. The earlier, a live telecast, was in 1954).
Richard II.
Twelfth Night (as Malvolio).
The Taming of the Shrew (as Petruchio, opposite Lilli Palmer as Katherine).
The Tempest (as Prospero). This last showcased an all-star cast that consisted of Lee Remick as Miranda, Roddy McDowall as Ariel, and Richard Burton as Caliban.

Evans was born at 28 Icen Way (where there is now a memorial plaque, revealed in 2013 by his great-great niece) in Dorchester, Dorset, England, to Laura (Turner) and Alfred Herbert Evans, a giving chemist and eager amateur star who made adaptations of books by Thomas Hardy for the local amateur company. Young Maurice made his very first phase appearance as a little kid in “Far From The Madding Crowd”. In 1927, he was one of a group of out-of-work stars including Laurence Olivier, picked to carry out in a “tryout” of R. C. Sherriff’s “Journey’s End” directed by James Whale at the Apollo Theatre in London, and later on in 1929 at the Savoy Theatre which had been rented by the Chicago theatre manager Maurice Browne. It was a huge success, running for 2 years and making Maurice’s name. His very first look on Broadway was in Romeo and Juliet opposite Katharine Cornell in 1936, but he made his greatest effect in Shakespeare’s Richard II, a manufacturing whose unexpected success was the surprise of the 1937, theatre period and allowed Evans to play Hamlet (1938) (the very first time that the play was carried out uncut on the New York stage), Falstaff in Henry IV, Part 1 (1939), Macbeth (1941) and Malvolio in Twelfth Night (1942) opposite the Viola of Helen Hayes, all under the direction of Margaret Webster.

 The Tempest (1960 TV) Maurice Evans + Richard Burton

At the end of the 1960s, Evans returned to England. Aside from an infrequent trip to the United States and occasional visits to retired actors in financial need (as a representative of the Actors’ Fund, of which he was a longtime trustee), he lived quietly in the Sussex countryside, near Brighton